Bolivia: Water People of Andes Face Extinction
http://www.truthout.org/042409F
Condensed by Native Village

Santa Ana de Chipaya: The Uru Chipaya may be the oldest surviving culture in the Andes, a tribe that has survived for 4,000 years on Bolivia’s barren interior plains. Today, they face extinction through climate change.

    The tribal chief, 62-year-old Felix Quispe, says the Lauca river which sustained them for thousands of years is drying up. His people cannot cope with the water loss and erratic rainfall that has turned crops to dust and livestock to skin and bones.

“Over here used to be all water,” Quispe said, gesturing across an arid plain. “There were ducks, crabs, reeds growing in the water. I remember that. What are we going to do? We are water people.” [Now] there is no pasture for animals, no rainfall. Nothing. Drought.”

The Uru Chipaya’s myths label them as  “water beings” rather than human beings. They are renown for surviving on the edges of a salt desert by flushing the soil with river water.

 As the Lauca dries, many Uru Chipaya have migrated into cities.  Today, fewer than 2,000 remain in the village of Santa Ana and the surrounding settlements.

    ”We have nothing to eat. That’s why our children are all leaving,” said Vicenta Condori, 52. She has two children in Chile.

    Some tribal members blame the crisis on neglect their gods, so the chief has lobbied for greater offerings and adherence to traditional customs. “This is in our own hands,” he said.

    But scientists say rising temperatures are melting Andean glaciers throughout Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. A ski resort in La Paz, the highest in South America, closed several years ago because of the retreat of the Chacaltaya glacier. In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that all Latin America’s glaciers could melt within 15 years. A new Oxfam report warns that within six years the number of people affected by climate-related crises will jump by 54% to 375,000,000.
"Indigenous peoples are on the frontlines of climate change," said the Inuit Circumpolar Council.

    Evo Morales, Bolivia’s president says his government would join indigenous groups for a “big mobilization”  to draw up a successor to the Kyoto treaty. They intend to push industrialised countries to cut carbon emissions. “We are preparing a team from the water and environment ministries to focus not only on the summit but beyond that.”

    With so many young people migrating to Spanish-speaking cities, the Uru language could disappear within a few generations. Some Uru Chipaya fear the battle for cultural survival could already be lost. The rutted streets of Santa Ana are largely deserted. “We are at risk of extinction,” said Juan Condori, 55. “The Chipaya could cease to exist within the next 50 years. The most important thing is water. If there is no water the Chipaya have no life.”

Source:  HERE *

fromquarkstoquasars
fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 9/01/14 — Peculiarities In Orion
This image, which was taken using the Green Bank Telescope (in West Virginia), showcases the complexities of the Great Orion nebula. Astronomers have long known that this stellar nursery is home to many peculiar features, which include “ribbons” of gas and evidence of a black hole lurking in the shadows. Now, astronomers captured the best image yet of one little know filamentary region within the nebula; a place pervaded by cool dust that’s just a few degrees above absolute zero.
Learn more about this region here: http://bit.ly/1zZMfAy
Image Credit: S. Schnee, et al.; B. Saxton, B. Kent (NRAO/AUI/NSF); Acknowledgements: NASA’s SkyView Facility & The Goddard Space Flight Center

fromquarkstoquasars:

Astronomy Photo of the Day (APotD): 9/01/14 — Peculiarities In Orion

This image, which was taken using the Green Bank Telescope (in West Virginia), showcases the complexities of the Great Orion nebula. Astronomers have long known that this stellar nursery is home to many peculiar features, which include “ribbons” of gas and evidence of a black hole lurking in the shadows. Now, astronomers captured the best image yet of one little know filamentary region within the nebula; a place pervaded by cool dust that’s just a few degrees above absolute zero.

Learn more about this region here: http://bit.ly/1zZMfAy

Image Credit: S. Schnee, et al.; B. Saxton, B. Kent (NRAO/AUI/NSF); Acknowledgements: NASA’s SkyView Facility & The Goddard Space Flight Center

Original Tomb of Peruvian Mummy which Inspired Munch´s Scream

It may seem odd to see Edvard Munch’s name in the news alongside archeological findings, but the recent rediscovery of a tomb in the Peruvian amazon has caused just that: the exact site where the mummy which inspired Munch’s “Scream”- one of the most reproduced paintings in the world- was discovered in the Peruvian Amazon was located last week.

The Norwegian painter’s most iconic work, The Scream, is renowned worldwide for the psychological turmoil it depicts. Several art historians have attested that the painting is based on the mummy of a Chachapoyas warrior which was discovered 130 years ago near the Utcubamba River and taken to Paris to be displayed in an exhibition at the Ethnographic Exchange Museum.

Art historian Wayne V. Anderson’s hypothesis that the mummy first inspired Paul Gauguin was confirmed by investigator Stefan Ziemendorff upon finding a book of sketches of the mummy. A decade later, art historian Robert Rosenblum established that Munch’s famous painting was also based on the mummy.

While walking with friends one evening, Munch had a vision in which the faces of his companions paled and a “huge endless scream course through nature” (as Munch himself described in a letter about the painting). Wishing to paint his vision, he used the Peruvian mummy as a model, probably inspired by Gauguin.

Now, Ziemendorff has announced that the site where the warrior’s mummy, as well as three others which were not taken to Paris, has been located thanks to details included in the chronicle written by Pierre Vidal-Senèze, who discovered and sacked the tomb in search of objects to sell in Europe.

Chachapoyas, located in the Amazonas region of Peru, is known mainly for the ruins of Kuelap Fortress (built by the culture of the same name), warriors’ mummies, and its carved sarcophogi.

Author: Inca World Team

Some family from Zacherevye / Belarus, has been keeping wolves as pets since 2009. The head of the family, Oleg Seleh, is a local game biologist. It was he who once brought wolf-cubs home.

The wolves are living on the territory of a hunting farm, two males and one female bore their young for the first time this spring. Oleg’s daughter, Alina, treats the predators as pets, they are fawning and even let her do some riding. When she pets the wolves she is never bitten, quite on the contrary, they lick her in the face fully obeying as they usually do in a wolf pack with a strict hierarchy. Looking at these photos, it’s hard to believe we see dangerous predators.

Elena Seleh, Oleg’s spouse, says that her husband knows perfectly well how to communicate with wolves with a special sound producing tool called a “vaba”.

Oleg had his first experience of communication with wolves ten years ago. For him it was a great pleasure to see the animals willingly coming back to him.

They doubted if the tamed animals would ever bear young, but they did in May 2014 – now they have four wolf-cubs. Oleg says: “Two wolves is a family, three wolves is a pack”. The female wolf liked a non-leader better but the pack leader didn’t let him approach her. They have a peculiar behavior during “a wolf wedding”. The leader really did a lot to attract her, danced and courted for several years, and finally she got pregnant to give birth to four cubs…The animals like to swim on hot days.

Oleg says this year was especially fertile for wolves, even those tamed by people.

Their female wolf does not have much trust in adults, only Alina, the girl, may catch her. As for the males – they have settled their conflicts and live in peace now.

What could people learn from wolves? They are very faithful, and it’s genic. Something people tend to forget is that these animals remember for their entire life. Even in ten years time, he will recognize the person who used to feed him.

They have excursions here daily, the most frequent visitors are newly married couples, they like to take wedding pictures with wolves. Many foreigners come too – Germans, Frenchmen, Swedes.

Source:  http://www.belta.by/